Teaching Empathy

Teaching Empathy, David A Levine

Teaching children how to interact with others is as equally important as instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. Published April 10, 2013, on forbes.com, here is an excerpt from David Levine’s article – Teaching Empathy: The Ancient Way Is Now Cutting Edge.

  1. Teach listening as a core skill and expect it as a cultural practice.Start by being an active listener yourself and give people the time they need to reflect. Time not made for someone is time wasted.
  2. Make dialogue a primary team, group or classroom practice. Dialogue opens the doors to exploration—what Peter Senge in his guide “The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook” calls “skillful discussion,” where thoughtful decisions can be made that honor all participants (or, in business, stakeholders).
  3. Identify roles, not organizational charts. When people are able to articulate their role, what they need to be successful and what gets in the way of their success, an empathic understanding is present and the beginnings of a healthy team, class or group takes shape.
  4. Lead with consistency, authenticity and honesty. Be clear as to why you are doing what you are doing. Do not lead or manage through personality but rather through articulation. To articulate is to clarify.

Read the full essay Teaching Empathy: The Ancient Way is now Cutting Edge

This post was originally published by forbes.com and was written by David A. Levine, the director of the School of Belonging Training Institute at Creative Response to Conflict (CRC) and a supporter of Ashoka’s Start Empathy initiative.

Photo: http://spanglishbaby.com/2012/08/how-learning-about-other-cultures-can-teach-our-kids-empathy/

About networkforpeace

Network for Peace through Dialogue (formerly the Center of International Learning) was begun in 1985 by sociologists, theologians, and educators from Germany, the Philippines and the United States united by their world view and wanting to participate in transformative change. The Center was to provide ongoing learning, analysis and collaboration between people of the Northern and Southern hemispheres. There were two specific goals: to promote democratic processes and to work toward de-militarization. Thus since 1985 The Network for Peace through Dialogue has been dedicated to connecting grassroots communities, both local and global in order to identify and research common issues and solutions in the areas of making peace and promoting just action. Our objective is to provide a platform so that communities and societies can expand understanding and discuss their differences within a dynamic environment to help resolve conflicts and cooperate more fully. In all our programs we do so by analyzing, facilitating, and fostering dialogue, identifying solutions and sharing information.
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